Metal-on-Metal (MoM) Hip Implants

All artificial hip implants pose risks to recipients. There is risk of infection, toxicity, and wear-and-tear of the component parts of the implant. Just as parts of the body wear out as we get older, implants may wear out. However, metal-on-metal (MoM) hip implant carry their own set of unique risks in addition to risks associated with hip implants in general.

If you or someone you love has suffered as a result of a hip implant system, please contact Green, Schafle & Gibbs’ experienced mass tort legal team for a free consultation at 1-866-462-3330 or by using our online contact form.

Beyond these acceptable risks lies the alarming realm of negligence, in which manufacturers produce a faulty product; products produce dangerous effects in their recipients; or the risks associated with certain products or procedures are hidden or misrepresented to the public. Often, manufacturers of these defective or dangerous hip implant products will be subject to recalls, regulatory action, and lawsuits.

Metal-on-Metal Hip Implant Recalls

According to the FDA, hip implants may be recalled by the manufacturer for a number of reasons. If your hip implant is recalled, this does not necessarily mean that the implant needs to be removed and replaced. In some cases the recall recommends different or more frequent monitoring. It is important to discuss the reason for the recall with your orthopaedic surgeon to determine the most appropriate course of action.

In the following sections, we deal with hip implant products which have been subject to regulatory action, recall, and/or lawsuits. 

POTENTIALLY DEFECTIVE HIP IMPLANT PRODUCTS

STRYKER HIP IMPLANT RECALL

Stryker Corp., maker of artificial hip implants, recalled two of its popular hip implants after serious widespread problems caused many patients to have the hip implants removed.

At best, hip replacement surgery is a traumatic procedure with a grueling recovery period. As a result of Stryker Corp.’s faulty hip implants, thousands of patients were forced to undergo painful hip replacement surgery twice, in addition to complications resulting from defective hip implants.

Research & Complaints Force Stryker to Recall Femoral Head Implants

In response to widespread patient complaints as well as an alarming investigation conducted by a team of medical doctors at The Rothman Institute at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Stryker Corporation has elected to recall its product, LFIT™ Anatomic CoCr V40™ Femoral Heads. The team of doctors, including Laura Matsen Ko, MD, Antonia F. Chen, MD, MBA, Gregory K. Deirmengian, MD, William J. Hozack, MD, and Peter F. Sharkey, MD, published an overview of femoral head implants in the August 17, 2016 issue of The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, which warned of the risks of catastrophic implant failure due to severe trunnion corrosion.

In its recall notice, Stryker cited higher than expected rates of complaint by patients of “taper-lock failure,” particularly in products manufactured prior to 2011. These failures present the following hazards to Stryker femoral head implant recipients:

  • Disassociation of femoral head from hip stem
  • Fractured hip stem trunnion
  • Excessive metallic debris
  • Insufficient Range of Motion
  • Insufficient soft tissue tension
  • Noise
  • Loss of implant: bone fixation strength
  • Excessive wear debris (polymeric)
  • Implant construct with a shortened neck length

Patients with LFIT™ Anatomic CoCr V40™ Femoral Head implants may suffer the following medical issues and injuries:

  • Pain
  • Loss of mobility
  • Inflammatory response
  • Adverse local tissue reaction
  • Dislocation
  • Joint instability
  • Revision to alleviate hazardous situation
  • Pain associated with implant loosening
  • Periprosthetic fracture
  • Leg length discrepancy

Not Stryker’s First Implant Recall

Stryker is the same company which issued a recall in 2012 for its Rejuvenate and ABG II modular-neck hip stem implants after thousands of patients found the implants were causing them severe medical issues. In November 2014, Stryker settled several thousand claims over the implants for $1.43 billion.

In 2012, Stryker recalled two of its hip implant systems - the Rejuvenate Modular and ABG II Modular-Neck Hip Stems. Following the recalls, Stryker faced several thousand claims by victims of the defective systems. In November 2015, Stryker settled claims for patients who received the hip systems before November 3, 2014 for almost $1.5 billion.

This settlement does not cover those patients who underwent hip surgery involving Stryker hip implants after November 3, 2014.

Revision Surgery for Stryker Hip Implants

Many recipients of Stryker Rejuvenate Modular and ABG II hip implant systems have only recently undergone revision surgery - or have not yet undergone surgery to replace those systems. Various options exist for those who suffered or are currently living with a failed hip implant. Most importantly, patients experiencing pain in their hip after surgery should consult with their physician to determine whether their implant system was manufactured by Stryker. Together, you can determine the best medical course of action for counteracting the effects of a failed implant.

Wright Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants

More than a thousand recipients of Wright Medical’s MoM hip replacement systems and Profemur Z Stem have sued the manufacturer for injuries and crippling due to product defects.

Wright Medical’s MoM Hip Implant and Profemur Z Stem

Wright Medical has been designing and manufacturing joint implants for more than 50 years. Lately however its reputation has been tarnished by a flurry of lawsuits over what appears to be a manufacturing defect in its CONSERVE line of MoM Hip Implant System and Profemur Z Stem.

Built with metal components, Wright’s hip implants have been prone to shedding metallic particles which move into surrounding tissues and blood. This shedding can lead to metal poisoning and tissue death, potentially crippling patients who have received the implants.

Wright Hip Implant Lawsuit

More than a thousand recipients of the CONSERVE line of Wright implants have sued the company for designing and manufacturing a defective product, along with the cost, pain, and suffering involved with revision surgery to remove and replace the faulty implants. The first lawsuit against Wright recently went to trial in Los Angeles: with a $4.5 Million dollar verdict against Wright for manufacturing defects.

Revision Surgery for Wright Hip Implants

Many recipients of the Wright’s MoM and Profemur Z Stem systems have only recently undergone revision surgery - or have not yet undergone surgery to replace those systems. Various options exist for those who suffered or are currently living with a failed hip implant. Most importantly, patients experiencing pain in their hip after surgery should consult with their physician to determine whether their implant system was manufactured by Wright Medical. Together, you can determine the best medical course of action for counteracting the effects of a failed implant.

DEPUY HIP IMPLANT RECALL

Pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson recalled its Depuy hip implants after injuries and crippling to patients caused the implants to be removed.

At best, hip replacement surgery is a traumatic procedure with a grueling recovery period. As a result of Johnson & Johnson’s faulty hip implants, thousands of patients were forced to undergo painful hip surgery twice, in addition to complications resulting from defective hip implants. Many recipients of the Depuy hip implant system were actually permanently crippled by the device.

In mid-2010, Johnson & Johnson recalled its Articular Surface Replacement, or A.S.R hip implant system. The system was manufactured by the pharmaceutical company’s unit, Depuy Orthopaedics. In spite of early unusually high failure rates, Johnson & Johnson continued to manufacture and distribute the ASR system to hospitals for implantation in patients. Later, incidents and studies showed that the defective device began to injure and cripple recipients.

Depuy Hip Defect & High Failure Rate

Photo by edwardolive/iStock / Getty Images

The Depuy ASR hip implant system consists of a metal ball and a metal cup. Over time, as the system wears down, the metal components shed metallic debris that creates particles that can damage tissue and in some cases cause crippling injuries.

Artificial hips typically last 15 years or more before wearing out and needing replacement. However, the Depuy ASR projections estimate that it will fail in 40% of patients within just 5 years.

According to the product liability lawsuits over the Depuy implants, Johnson & Johnson knew about the product’s defects along with its unusually high rate of failure long before this information came to light in public.

Depuy ASR Hip Implant Lawsuit

As a result of product defects and high failure rates, Johnson & Johnson has tentatively agreed to a settlement that could reach up to $4 billion to resolve thousands of lawsuits filed against the pharmaceutical giant. Currently, each patient harmed by the Depuy ASR would receive around $350,000 in compensation, depending on the patient’s age and health.

Revision Surgery for Depuy Hip Implants

Many recipients of the Depuy ASR hip implant system have only recently undergone revision surgery - or have not yet undergone surgery to replace those systems. Various options exist for those who suffered or are currently living with a failed hip implant. Most importantly, patients experiencing pain in their hip after surgery should consult with their physician to determine whether their implant system was manufactured by Depuy/Johnson & Johnson. Together, you can determine the best medical course of action for counteracting the effects of a failed implant.


Hip Implant Defect & Recall Attorneys

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If you or someone you love has suffered as a result of a hip implant system, please contact our experienced mass tort legal team for a free consultation at 1-866-462-3330 or by using our online contact form.

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